Powerful Relationships Support Powerful Marketing 

Marketing is enhanced with collaboration. There are simply too many parts to do them all, while still serving clients well. Your business will do best when you can create powerful relationships to support you. It can enhance your wellbeing to be part of a supported team rather than an isolated solopreneur. It also allows you to make a deeper difference in the world as you free up time and energy to grow your business or to work in your highest state, while others hold the pieces you don’t care to.  

 Relationships are powerful when you: 

Clearly share your expectations, desires and outcomes. Take the time to communicate as needed. Indirect or unspoken ideas can undermine a potentially successful collaboration. Don’t worry about being abrupt or too direct. Others generally appreciate clear boundaries and knowing where you stand.  

Expect the best. When you assume there are amazing, talented people who are a perfect fit for you in the world, there are. When you worry that there is no one who can do it as well as you, there they are. Earlier hurts or disappointments already happened—don’t let them color your present day.  

Plan to spend money and time. Collaborative efforts generally pay off over time. Like all relationships, the time and resources you invest in them are what makes them blossom. Expect to pay well for talent and contribution, just as you expect to earn that for your work.  

Know that it’s a process. Start small and be willing to build on that little by little. It takes patience and repeated input to craft a successful, long-term relationship. Don’t look for quick wins, look for incremental forward movement. 

Put in the time with others and you’ll reap the rewards. Want to know more? Visit www.lindabasso.com.

Authenticity in Relationships 

Sometimes my heart clenches when the phone rings. It happens when callers dive right into an obvious script. They typically represent a large company that developed a perfect script based on human behavior. They ask you yes or no and multiple choice questions. Then they ask for a credit card number. I often abandon the phone long before hearing the whole script. However, as a business consultant and former technology architect, I sometimes listen out of curiosity.  

It amazes me that companies believe someone would whip out a credit card without developing an authentic relationship. In my book, it falls short of trustworthy communication. I guess people provide their cards, or the calls would stop.  

What does this have to do with a small business owner? It is about relationships. I meet business people who dive right into a sale before they even know me. It is not as extreme as the programmed script described, but it is just as uncomfortable.  

Build a relationship with people. If you meet someone and feel a connection, nurture it. I’ve met people at networking events who take my card while looking around for the next one. They sometimes put me on their list without permission. I prefer to develop a relationship first. Here are my tips for developing strong relationships: 

  1. Follow up after meeting someone. 
  2. Keep in touch for no specific reason. 
  3. Give first-perhaps a sample service or product. 
  4. Pass along introductions, articles or a reference to your conversations. 
  5. Keep in touch. 
  6. Intersperse sales offers with other interactions. 

I have read it takes up to seven interactions to build rapport. How can you blend service, samples, inspiration and other reasons to keep in touch rather than exclusively asking for the sale? Build an authentic relationship. It can be powerful. 

The Power of Relationships 

When you are a member of a team, each relationship is unique. Some focus on the job at hand, and some are based on the connection you have with each member. 

When I was 9 years old, my parents had me join a military-style marching band called the Weldonians. It was here I learned the value of relationships and the power it generated to the whole team. 

I was a member of the majorette corps. The entire band was made up of 150+ kids ranging in age from 3 to 23. We won as a unit and lost as a unit. As a member of this band, it was the responsibility for the older kids to look after the younger kids. We learned to have the backs of our neighbors. Practices were a weekend affair, with practice all day Saturday and half a day Sunday and a performance every Sunday afternoon. 

Crisp straight lines, intricate formations, great music and high-stepping majorettes were all part of the entertainment package. The tight relationships we formed helped us support each other in performing the best we could. 

It is through those relationships we were able as a unit to win awards; perform as the half-time entertainment for the Oakland Raiders a couple of times a month for home games; receive invitations to perform in the Chinese New Year Parade in San Francisco; and perform at the Rose Bowl and in the Rose Parade.  

The power of relationships channeled into one direction was amazing to participate in during the time I was a member of the Weldonians. I will never forget the relationships and the feeling of knowing someone had my back.  

Understand that as a part of the whole, you are able to accomplish something so much bigger than you could do on your own!